LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION! GO MILKWEED BUGS!



MILKWEED BUGS- MILKWEED BUG INTRODUCTION:

Milkweed Bugs!! By: Team 5- Olga, Mason, Leah, and Griffin K.! Take a look at all of this YOU don't want to miss out on this! We have links, pictures, information, a voki, and coming soon MORE! To learn more about Milkweed bugs, you will have to visit these links and READ THIS INFORMATION!! NOW!!!!
Here are some good links that we got our information and pictures from! They helped us a lot too! Hope you enjoy all these links! Here they are! Try them now:
http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/IPM.asp?code=309&group=54&level=s and photovalet.com and http://www.dirtdoctor.com/view_question.php?id=819and http://photovalet.com/search?search=milkweed+bugs&f=0&aid=0&page=1 and http://www.askkids.com/web?qsrc=167&o=0&l=dir&aflt=&q=milkweed+bugand http://ci.mpls.k12.mn.us/sites/5df1b159-7ce3-4aa3-8e71-8e60a7b98e6c/uploads/LS_Grade_2_Invest_3_2.pdf and askkids.com andhttp://lawrencehallofscience.org/foss/fossweb/teachers/materials/plantanimal/milkweedbugs.html and http://www.askkids.com/pictures?qsrc=167&o=0&l=dir&q=milkweed%20bug&aflt and http://www.pictures.com/search?q=Milkweed+bugs and http://www.buzzle.com/articles/milkweed-bug-life-cycle.html and buzzle.com and [[http://www.askkids.com/web?qsrc=167&o=0&l=dir&aflt=kids&q=milkweed+bugs&search=search ]] and MORE!!!



MILKWEED BUGS- MILKWEED BUG FACTS:

Milkweed bug on leaf!
Milkweed bug on leaf!



Milkweed bugs all in a pile!
Milkweed bugs all in a pile!

These are milkweed bugs on a log
These are milkweed bugs on a log

Fun Facts about Milkweed bugs : Bugs have the usual complement of structures that they share with just about all other insects: six legs, three body parts (head, thorax, and abdomen), and two antennae. True bugs (order Hemiptera) do not have mouths for biting and chewing food—they have a tubelike beak for sucking fluids. The milkweed bug in nature sucks nutrients from milkweed seeds, but those in the classroom have been bred to feed exclusively on sunflower seeds. Milkweed bugs grow faster in when it's warm or in warn temperatures. Because warmth speeds up all their body development. At room temperature, Milkweed bugs are adults in milkweed bugs specifically is the stages they go through from hatching to maturity. Bugs go through simple metamorphosis. The insect emerges from an egg looking like a tiny version of the adult, with slight differences in body proportions and incompletely developed wings. The immature bugs are called nymphs. Newly hatched nymphs are analogous to the larvae of insects that go through complete metamorphosis, in that their prime directive is to eat and grow. As with all insects, in order to grow the nymphs must molt periodically. Just after molting the bug is creamy yellow with bright red legs and antennae. Within a few hours the body turns dark orange, and the legs and antennae resume their usual black color. The crispy about a month. Milkweed bugs little molts can be seen in the milkweed bug habitat about a week after the bugs hatch. Students may think their milkweed bugs are dying or that spiders and ants have invaded the habitat. It may take a while for students to figure out what the molts really are. There are two different types of Milkweed bugs: the Small Eastern Milkweed bug (Lygaeus kalmii) and the Large Milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus)! Let’s start with the Small Eastern Milkweed bug. Description: They are 3/8 - 1/2" (11-12 mm). They have a black with red spot on their head and a red band across the prothorax (a part of their body). Front wings have a red, x-shaped mark on a thickened part and gray or white spots on black, film-like part. Habitat: Meadows and fields. Range: Throughout the United States. Food: Maturing and mature seeds of milkweeds. Life Cycle: Eggs are laid on milkweeds. When spring plants and flower buds show, Nymphs, similar to adults, develop quickly into adults overwinter. One or more generations a year.Now, on to the Large Milkweed bug! Description: 3/8 - 5/8 (10 – 15mm). Stretched oval. Black with red (older) or orange (younger) markings on all edges of thorax and scutellum (parts of the body). Wings stripy with red or orange and black. Nymph stage is red with black antennae and legs. Habitat: Meadows and fields. Range: East of the Rocky Mountains, rare in the North. Food: Maturing and matured seeds of milkweeds. Life Cycle: Small, extended eggs are bright red with three, down curved ridges near the tip. They hatch in the spring. Adults overwinter, appearing in great numbers in long winter days. One or more generations a year. Here is a picture of a Milkweed bug (underneath).


MILKWEED BUGS HABITAT :The six spotted Milkweed bug Occurs in south Texas, south to Central America! Next, the large Milkweed bug lives in eastern and southwestern United States, plus Ontario; most common in southeast! Then, the Small Milkweed bug lives much of United States and southern Canada! Finally, the habitat of the large milkweed bug spreads east of the Rocky Mountains. It is found as far north as Ontario, Canada, but is more abundant in south-eastern United States. Groups of insects in all stages of development are commonly found between May and October on common insect plants.Some milkweed bugs also live in grasslands.The milkweed bug can be found in small groups on a milkweed plant, offen under leaves. They are super yucky! Here is a picture of Milkweed bugs habitat (underneath). Most mlikweed bugs live in Grasslands. They need water, food, sheltetr, and air!
Milkweed bug on leaf!
Milkweed bug on leaf!

Milkweed bug on leaf!

This is a picture of a grassy field
This is a picture of a grassy field

This is a picture of a grassy field
MILKWEED BUGS behaviors: Milkweed bugs have a couple of predators because they think in their bodies bad tasting compounds found in the sap of milkweed plants. The bugs use the bright bruise to show their bad taste. New birds that taste their first milkweed bug are unlikely to try to eat another orange and black insect! Some insects that do not taste bad use similar color patterns to fool birds. These are known as “mimics”. Milkweed bugs often gather in groups on the milkweed plant. This outgoing behavior probably enhances their warning bruise. In the container you may see groups of bugs forming at night. During the day they are usually found feeding on seeds or walking around the container. Sometimes groups form on the side of the container away from the seeds when some of the bugs are molting. Milkweed bugs prey upon nothing. When a milkweed bug eats it is usually eat at one o clock!





MILKWEED BUGS Life cycle . Milkweed bugs life cycle is an incomplete life cycle. Their life cycle stages are egg, nymth, and adult. Milkweed bugs advance through five nymphal stages (instars) as they mature. Each molt produces a larger nymph that is more completely developed. As the bugs grow, the dark wings appear on the backs of the bugs as black spots. Other black markings start to appear and eventually develop into the characteristic patterns of black and orange by which the adults of the two sexes can be identified. The last molt reveals the adult. There is no pupal resting stage as in insects that undergo complete metamorphosis—the large nymph simply molts, and away walks the adult. Milkweed bugs have a short life cycle and are easy to use. The milkweed bug feel complete metamorphosis. The nymphs look like adults but do not have full wings and their color pattern is different. They have five instars before they reach adulthood. Black wing pads appear early in their development. Eggs are a light lemon yellow changing to a reddish color. Incubation period is about four to five days. Each molt lasts five to six days. An adult will live for about one month. The insect overwinters as an adult. They live about thirteen years! Here is a good picture about Milkweed bug's life cycle (underneath).
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This is milkweed bug changing it's form
This is milkweed bug changing it's form
Buglif6.gif
Buglif6.gif


The milkweed bug above is changing it's form
MILKWEED BUGS Food. Milkweed bugs continue to feed as adults, inserting their long beaks into sunflower seeds to suck out oils and other nutrients. This is a picture of Milkweed bugs
food (underneath).

Milkweed Bug, OEHV01P07_10
Milkweed Bug, OEHV01P07_10

Milkweed Bug, OEHV01P07_10

MILKWEED BUGS Body. Mating is easily observed, as the two mating bugs remain attached end to end for an extended time. It is possible to distinguish female and male adults by body markings. Look on the ventral (belly) side of the bugs. The tip of the abdomen is black, followed by a solid orange segment (with tiny black dots at the edges). If the next two segments following the orange band have solid black bands, the bug is a male. However, if the segment following the orange band is orange in the middle, making it look like it has two large black spots on the sides, followed by a segment with a solid black band, the bug is female. (See the Milkweed Bug Male and Female poster.) Males tend to be smaller than females. Look for mating bugs to identify males and females—there will always be one of each in such pairings. Several days to 2 weeks after mating, the female lays a cluster of 50 or more yellow eggs (which turn orange fairly quickly) in a wad of cotton. The eggs can be removed to a new culture container or left in the habitat to continue the life cycle. 1/100 of an ounce.


What are Milkweed bugs used for? It the he seeds, leaves and stems of milkweed. It is found in small groups of milkweed- often on the stems, leaves and on the seed pods. The bodies of milkweed bugs contain toxic compounds- from the sap which they suck from milkweed. Milkweed bugs are true bugs. They are used as research insects.Because they are easy to use in the laboratory. Milkweed bugs have a short life cycle and are easy to use.


Red and black Milkweed bug!
Red and black Milkweed bug!

Red and black Milkweed bug!

MILKWEED BUGS Symptoms and Diagnosis Milkweed bugs are more of a bother than a threat to milkweed plants. They feed on the seeds by piercing the seed pod and can be found in all stages of growth on the plants in mid to late summer.
Milkweed bugs on a flower!
Milkweed bugs on a flower!

Milkweed bugs on a flower!

MILKWEED BUGS Strategies 1. Live with the damage. Milkweed bugs do little damage and are only present for a short period of time. Just living with the insects may be the most prudent thing to do. 2. Sanitation. Remove leaf litter and spent stalks in the fall to eliminate overwintering sites. 3. Use insecticidal soap. For quick control of an infestation insecticidal soaps are very effective and safe. Good coverage of the insects with the spray is necessary for it to be effective. Use chemical insecticides. If necessary use chemical insecticides such as malathion or carbaryl. On honeyvine milkweed could be considered beneficial for feeding on the seed pods thereby reducing the seed production of this weed. Milkweed bugs nymphs on the seed pod of a honeyvine milkweed. 10. Milkweed bug nymphs in various stages! The large milkweed bug,||
Milkweed Bug
Milkweed Bug
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On-cop-elt-us fas-ciat-us , is the color orange-red and black. It has a long proboscis
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Small Milkweed Bug (Lygaeus kalmii) - Lygaeus kalmii
Small Milkweed Bug (Lygaeus kalmii) - Lygaeus kalmii


328410-31220-55.jpg
Milkweed bug close-up
and is a piercing sucking insect. Team5- Olga, Mason, Leah, and Griffin K.!
Check out photovalet.com an

http://photovalet.com/searchsearch=milkweed+bugs&f=0&aid=0&page=1 for cool Milkweed bug pictures!